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Community Remembers: VIII WWI Poppy Cascade Update

We’re really not sure how many poppies we have at the moment. The vicar tells me that it’s around four thousand, and I’m not about to start counting. It’s a remarkable response from a community of the size of North Baddesley.

The assembly work continues and there’s an opportunity to help with that this week.

Into Perfect Peace

As part of ‘Into Perfect Peace’ the exhibitionthat goes with 'Over the Top' there will be an array of doves hanging in the church.  We’d love anyone who would like to contribute to the exhibition to make a dove, writing your hopes for peace inside, using the origami pattern at the link below. We’ve even sourced paper so you don’t have to. Pick your ‘make a dove kit’ up from All Saints Church during the week.

Remember the marks on this community

WWI was the first total war in history. The warring nations were scarred in a unique way. North Baddesley, like every village in Hampshire, did not receive back all who it had given to the war. In fact in all England only 53 villages have no need of a memorial to lost sons, fathers or husbands. Today, memory is fading, remembered only in road names: like the Betteridge Family, or in persisting place names like these:

  • Glebe Cottage - home to Private F. Griffin, severely wounded at the Third battle of Ypres.
  • Castle Cottage - home to Private F. Smith, served in Gaza and the Battle of Jerusalem.
  • Nutburn Road - where Private A.W.M Smith who served at St Eloi, Hill 60, Ypres, Vimy Ridge, the Somme, Arras, and Passchendale lived.

Remember lest we repeat ourselves

The great wish of those who fought the Great European War: that it should be a war to end all wars, has not been met. The battlefields of the Western Front continue to give up the dead from WWI 100 years on. Meanwhile in Yemen, Sudan, South Sudan, Syria, Burma and many other places around the world each day brings more bodies buried in haste and terror. We pray that marking WWI 100 will motivate our village to become more a place of peace and mercy.


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